Introgressing thinopyrum intermedium stripe rust resistance genes into wheat

Project Details

Status: Active
Investment: $166,350
Commodity: Wheat
Organization: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Lethbridge
Investigator: André Laroche

Breeding for biotic stress like stripe rust is an ongoing challenge due to the continuous emergence of newly-adapted races.

Why is this research important for Alberta ag?

Plant breeding is a continuous process to align crop improvement objectives with that of continuously evolving biotic threats against crops. Breeding for biotic stress like stripe rust is an ongoing challenge due to the continuous emergence of newly-adapted races.

This research aims to translate the research findings of a recently concluded upstream research project where novel genetic sources of resistance against pathogens, including stripe rust, have been identified using the novel RenSeq method in a diversity panel of intermediate wheatgrass accessions.

Development of breeder-friendly DNA markers to track the transfer from introgression lines into wheat cultivars, functional characterization and validation studies of the novel genes and alleles conferring stripe rust resistance, have been proposed using proven biotechnological, genomic, and gene editing tools. Broadening the genetic base of released wheat cultivars by deploying novel sources of resistance from wheatgrass will make them more resilient to emerging races of stripe rust.

What benefits can producers expect from this research?

Incorporating diverse sources of genetic resistance will have both economic and ecological benefits for Canadian wheat producers.

How will these research findings reach producers on-farm?

All Canadian breeders will be made aware of the new fundings when available so they can enter in their respective breeding pipelines and different combinations of R genes can be integrated for effective and lasting resistance against stripe rust.

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